Science

11 Jan 2022

Man from U.S. gets Genetically-Modified Pig Heart in World-first Transplant

Man from U.S. gets Genetically-Modified Pig Heart in World-first Transplant

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A 57-Year old man from the U.S. has become the first person in the world to get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig.



Doctors say that David Bennett at 57 of Age, is doing well three days after the experimental seven-hour procedure in Baltimore.



The transplant was mentioned as the last hope of saving Mr Bennett's life, though it is not yet clear what his long-term chances of survival are.



"It was either die or do this transplant," Mr Bennett explained a day before the surgery.

"I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," he said.



Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center were granted a special dispensation by the US medical regulator to carry out the procedure, on the basis that Mr Bennett - who has terminal heart disease - would otherwise have died, according to the BBC News.


The patient had been deemed ineligible for a human transplant, a decision that is often taken by doctors when the patient is in very poor health. The pig used in the transplant had been genetically modified to knock out several genes that would have led to the organ being rejected by Mr Bennett's body, the AFP news agency reports.


©Photo: REUTERS