Science

26 Jan 2022

Monetary Assistance for Impoverished Mothers can Improve Brain Activity in Babies: Study

Monetary Assistance for Impoverished Mothers can Improve Brain Activity in Babies: Study

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A new research study has found that providing low-income mothers with a considerable monetary assistance can result in a spike in brain activity among their babies.


The study published by the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, was conducted on 1,000 mothers and infants from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Participating mothers were given an amount of $333 each month which considerably increased their annual income of about $20,000 by 20%. Researchers found that this significantly enhanced the cognitive activity in their infants’ brains.


In contrast, a control group of participants where the mothers were given only $20 each month did not yield similar results in their children.


This study is pivotal as it adds to a growing body of research indicating that childhood penury can cause significant changes in the structure and functions of the brain.