Climate change

1 Mar 2022

IPCC Issues Gloomiest Warning on ‘Irreversible’ Effects of Climate Change

IPCC Issues Gloomiest Warning on ‘Irreversible’ Effects of Climate Change

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The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued its most dire caution till date, warning the world that human beings and nature are too overwhelmed to adapt to the increasingly unstable environmental conditions on earth.


The UN’s latest study has discovered that several effects of global warming have become “irreversible” at this point. The study also found that more than 40% of the world’s population are “highly vulnerable” to climatic conditions.


However, if temperature increases are maintained below 1.5 degrees worldwide, there is still hope to considerably offset the predicted outcomes.


Professor Debra Roberts, Co-Chair of the IPCC, said, "Our report clearly indicates that places where people live and work may cease to exist, that ecosystems and species that we've all grown up with and that are central to our cultures and inform our languages may disappear.” She contends that “this is the decade of action, if we are going to turn things around."